Hats off to Hank, but keep ‘em on for the Honaker Trail, Goosenecks State Park, Mexican Hat, UT

Distance: ~5 Miles RT, Out & Back (Down and Up)

Elevation gain: ~1,800

Difficulty: Somewhat strenuous due to consistent descent and ascent, some slippery footing and scrambling—minimal “exposure” as far as danger level, but 100% sun exposure. Not for the weak of knees or heart. Poles recommended.

Named after its creator, Henry Honaker, this rugged route dates back to the 1890s and the heyday of Utah’s Wild West gold rush. Thank him for this scenic, cliff-hugging trail that originated as a supply route from the San Juan River to the rim ledges. While the gold rush here was short-lived, the trail has been a long-lived attraction for scientists, geologists, recreational hikers, and rafters. The dramatic geological formations date back 300 million years and are a source of fascination for all.

As you descend the trail, you may note how the rock colors and their composition change. As you pause to take in the panoramic views, catch your breath, and gulp some water, keep your eyes open for fossils (including crinoids, brachiopods, and various trace fossils). In the dry and sometimes unforgiving desert, it’s hard to imagine there was a time when all of this was underwater.

The yellow numbers that you’ll see painted on the cliffs are remnants from a 1952 field symposium on the rocks of the Honaker and Paradox Formations, not a tabulation of the numerous switchbacks though they may seem so.

While it’s always a reward to jump in a lake or a river on a hike, the silty San Juan River may refresh you but likely won’t dazzle you with her mud-colored water.

The Honaker Trail is a great, off-the-beaten-track adventure hike and a must-do for geology buffs. We only encountered a couple of rafters exploring the bottom reaches of the trail.

Notes: Of course, you must drive into Goosenecks State Park itself to enjoy the main panoramic viewpoint while you’re there. The feature photo is from that viewpoint as are these next two.

On a clear day, you can see Monument Valley in the distance. Bring an excess of water & Gatorade—what you think is too much will be just right. This trail is completely exposed, so get an early start if you’re going in the summer and be equipped with sunscreen, a hat, and EXTRA water. (Yes, I know I mentioned that already.)

Getting there: There are no signs for this trailhead. It’s marked only by a huge cairn pyramid at the start of the trail and at the bottom. At Goosenecks State Park, take the dirt road at mile marker 3 (before the entry gate) and stay left when it forks. A 2WD car can make it to the first unmarked “parking area,” and it’s just  .25+ to the trailhead from there. Otherwise, a 4 WD, high-clearance vehicle can take you to a “parking area” closer to the trailhead.

It’s a scenic drive as well.

Oh, and here’s a pic of Mexican Hat along the way. Beauty everywhere you look.

Happy Trails!

Summiting Magnificent Mount Timpanogos: Waterfalls, Wildflowers, Wildlife, & Wild Views—Oh my!

Elevation gain:5,384ft

Mileage: ~15 Miles RT

Summit: 11,752ft, the 2nd highest mountain in Utah

Difficulty: Hard, strenuous – due to altitude, elevation gain, and ~1.5 miles ea way of an unstable, tortuous, talus field

Happened to be in the area and made the spontaneous decision to hike Mount Timpanogos. So glad I did. By far, Mount Timp (as the locals call it) is my new, all-time favorite hike / peak. And I’ve done a ton of hiking across the country and around the world. I couldn’t stop smiling all the way to the 11,752-foot summit and back. Ok, maybe my smile was a bit of a grimace through the 1.5 miles back and forth across the treacherous talus strewn avalanche field.  Rest assured, the grimace quickly reverted to ear to ear, exuberant glee once I reached the summit and then again as I descended back down to the lake.

What’s make Mount Timpanogos so wonderful, you ask? Well, the title gave it way, but in case you missed it:

  • Abundant colorful, wildflowers of more varieties than I’ve ever seen
  • Dazzling waterfalls around nearly very switchback
  • Pristine alpine lake and snow field a couple miles from the summit
  • Muscular mountain goats guarding the upper slopes and frolicking by the lake
  • 5,384 ft elevation gain in altitude delivers a fitness challenge and solid workout
  • Sweeping views of Utah Valley from the saddle and spectacular panoramic views from the summit

This hike had it all—absolutely enchanting.

Started the trail in a steady rain, and walked up a verdant paved path for about a mile and a half or so before the pavement gave way to the elements.  Plentiful wildflowers and sparkling waterfalls distracted from the effort of the climb and the sun’s radiance soon highlighted all of the beauty, mist rising. The trail is easy to follow with plenty of switchbacks to help mitigate the elevation gain. It felt almost tropical at times.

The lovely Hidden Lake Basin and Emerald Lake are destinations for many, including the mountain goats.

Those who push on beyond the mile and ½ talus torture field and onward and upward still, are well rewarded at the summit.

Pay your respects to the kings of the mountain along the way. If you have good eyesight, you might spy the summit hut from thousands of feet below. It’s a bit daunting and exciting because it seems so far away, almost out of reach.

From the summit, you’ll take in dizzying 360 degree views of Utah Valley and Utah Lake to the west, Lone Peak and American Fork Twin Peaks to the north and expansive views everywhere in between.

Disclaimer: I experienced Mt. Timp in her July glory. I was told by locals that I wouldn’t recognize her in the Fall when the waterfalls are dry, the wildflowers have disappeared, and the green meadows have turned to yellow hay. Others report that Fall colors are nice here. Someday, perhaps I’ll be back to see for myself. In the meantime, if you’ve been in another season, let me know what it was like.

Notes: I’d say hiking shoes are a must to navigate the talus field. There were some hard core, ultra runners in trail runners. (I know – WOW!) Hiking poles are also a nice to have, given the elevation gain and loss. Layers are always smart at altitude. Be aware of weather changes and avalanche danger.

Getting there: I-15N to Pleasant Grove, exit 275. Follow N County Blvd and UT-92 E to the Aspen Grove trailhead.

Stay tuned: I’ll be posting the videos soon!

Happy trails!

2 Splendid, Scenic Road Bike Routes: N. Rim Grand Canyon, Az

Route: Grand Canyon Lodge to Cape Royal and Imperial Point

Mileage:~52

Elevation gain: ~3,950ft of climbing at an elevation around ~8000ft

The road sign for Cape Royal says narrow and windy, not recommended for campers so there are no campers on it and very few cars, especially if you get an early start. I defaulted to my gravel bike as I feel a little more secure on it, should I need to suddenly swerve off road. While there isn’t much, if any, of a shoulder most of the time, I felt safe. A road bike would be perfectly fine and a bit faster. Inn my opinon, Cape Royal offers the most dramatic views even though Imperial Point is the highest lookout at 8,800ft. Also, for some reason, the sky was much clearer at Cape Royal. Consider packing some goodies and having your snack at Cape Royal. I was lucky enough to hit it in full wildflower bloom. (My pictures just hint at the incredible views!)

Happy Cycling!

Route: Grand Canyon Lodge to Jacob’s Lake

Mileage: ~41 (1 way)

Elevation gain: ~1,700

A great second day ride in the North Rim, heading back out the park to Jacob’s Lake. Perhaps you have some noncyclist friends who would opt for picking you up in Jacob’s Lake on the way home, or perhaps you’d like to double your mileage for an out and back? Have lunch in Jacob’s Lake and climb back to the rim? Whatever your pleasure, it will be a pleasure. The scenery is lovely to enjoy from a secure shoulder. Some, but not much car traffic, makes for a serene ride. Bison traffic may be a factor if you’re lucky. Keep a safe distance – they can charge 35 mph, (jump 6ft high), and I’ve heard they have a “thing” for bikers. (Recalling my cross-Catalina ride bison encounter.)

Since the North Rim of the Grand Canyon only receives 10% the visitation of the South Rim, it’s quite peaceful with minimal car traffic. Got to love it!

Thanks, Jud! Taking in the panoramic Jud Wiebe Memorial Trail, Telluride, CO

Elevation gain: 1,300 ft (From 8,750ft to 10,050ft)

Distance: 3.1 miles, loop (Note the 2 ends of the loop are about a half mile apart)

Difficulty: Moderate ++, depending upon your fitness level and altitude acclimation, most of the incline is packed into the 1st mile either way you go.

This wonderful panoramic trail was the vision of former Forest Service Recreation Manager Jud Wiebe and it is indeed a vision—from the panoramic view of Telluride below, the mountains beyond, the aspen groves, the foresty vibes, and the wildflowers sprinkled along the trail. You’ll be breathless from the beauty and the thin air.

Ps. There’s a short offshoot waterfall trail here that’s a must do too. Post coming soon.

Getting there:  S. Take UT-46 E, CO-90 E and CO-145 S to N Aspen St in Telluride

Happy Trails!

Heavenly Hematite Lake, Silverton, CO

Elevation gain:2,615

Mileage: 4 Roundtrip

Difficulty: Hard— steep climb in elevation 10k-12k+

Hematite Lake, you had me at hello with your plentiful wildflowers, gurgling streams, and sparkling gem of a lake. So much quintessential Colorado beauty packed into this short, steep, sweet hike. I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves.

Note: The trail is single track consistent incline with few switchbacks; consider poles.

Getting there: US-550 S to Silverton, left on Co Rd 2305 ft, left on Greene St and right in CO Rd 2. The trailhead is 0.2mi before the bridge that crosses the Animas. The parking area is on the south side of the road, and the trail begins as two tracks that lead up a grassy hill. Soon it turns into single track and up and away you go. (There are trails beyond the lake to some mine shafts if you wish to explore further.)

Happy Trails!