Take the Road Less Traveled: Mountain Biking the High Point Truck Trail (FSR 8S05)

Bike up the backside of Palomar Mountain. Get a great workout while enjoying some solitude and splendid views of the San Diego back country, including Vail Lake and numerous snow-capped peaks (Thomas Mountain, San Jacinto, and San Gorgonio). This is nontechnical mountain biking at its best. If you like a climb with views, it’s a good one. Exceeded my expectations.

Road restrictions
Their loss, our advantage. 
L points to trail
When you can visualize a goal, you can attain it!

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We turned around at mile 8 as the trail was getting muddy and we were running out of daylight. It’s worth coming back to finish it off. Will update this post when I do. Until then, let the good times roll! What a spectacular way to spend the first day of 2020!

L and Palomar

Miles: 12 Miles / 24 Miles Roundtrip

Elevation: ~4,000 ft

Difficulty: Depends on your fitness level, knee health, and affinity for climbs. Very doable, the super steep sections are relatively short. Terrain has some rutty sections, but mostly good. This would also be a great trail run, or training for the Catalina Marathon, or any endurance races.

Directions: From Temecula, take HWY 79 east for 18 miles. Stay on HWY 79 and make a right 2/10ths of a mile past the junction of HWY 371 to an RV park/resort. Follow the paved road for 0.3 miles then park in the large dirt area in front of the Fire Service Road 8S05

Notes: There’s no water along this exposed route—plan accordingly. It’s hot during the summer and you may encounter snow during winter, or mud after heavy rains or melts. Vehicles are allowed on this route, but seasonal closures for motorized access often occur. (A bonus for mountain bikers and trail runners.) Further up the mountain, the Forest Service has labeled the High Point Truck Trail (8S05) as 9S09 between this junction and the Palomar Divide Truck. When in doubt, stay on the most “main” looking route.

mtb dog
Celebrity MTB Canine Sighting

Bonus: Be sure to top off your ride with a visit to Ricardo Breceda’s amazing outdoor gallery of metal sculptures. Also, check out his work in wild open spaces of Anza Borrego too!

Photo Post: Ediz Hook and Port Angeles, WA

Ediz Hook in Port Angeles is a 3-mile-long sand spit that extends from the northern shore of the Olympic Peninsula. It features great views of the Olympic Mountains, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca.  If you visit, be sure to keep your eyes out for the  tribe of feral cats that inhabit this rugged, scenic landscape. They blend in well.

As you explore the Port Angeles area, you’ll likely run into other friendly locals.

Picturesque photo ops abound around every corner.

Port Angeles horse and barn

Lots to do in this Pacific Northwest playground.

Hike or Mountain Bike the Spruce Railroad Trail

Hike the Storm King Trail

Hike or Mountain Bike the Elwah River Area and Do the Coleville Flow

Explore Hurricane Ridge , Olympic National Park

 

 

Storm King: Short, steep, sweet trail with sweeping views of Lake Crescent

Distance: 3.8 Miles Round Trip

Elevation gain: ~1700 ft

Difficulty: Moderate or Difficult, depending on your fitness level and daring level with the ropes on top. (Some call it strenuous. All call it steep.)

The trail climbs persistently through the pine, cedar, and hemlock trees.

 

 

 

After countless switchbacks, you’ll be treated to several expansive views of Lake Crescent and, if you’re lucky, out to the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

 

 

 

The maintained trail ends at about 1.3 miles. If you are “up” for it, pun intended, you can continue on the “climbers trail”. Your scramble to further heights will be aided by several sections of ropes.

Ken on storm king
Ken on the ropes

Proceed with caution, it’s quite exposed and super slippery.

 

 

 

 

On the way down, follow the short marked trail to Marymere Falls for the cool solace of Barnes Creek and the waterfall.

M Falls

Getting there: Parking and the trail head for both this hike and the Marymere Falls hike is located right next to the Storm King ranger station, Lake Crescent right off Hwy 101, 20 miles west of Port Angeles, milepost 228.

Parking: Free

Be sure to stop by The Lake Crescent Lodge and beach for some refreshments and photo ops before you leave.

Lake Crescent Lodge

 

 

 

After you’ve worked up your appetite, head to the First Street Haven (before noon) or the Next Door Gastropub (noon and after)  and get your grub on at these great Port Angeles restaurants.

For more nearby adventures check out the Spruce Railroad Trail by foot or 2 wheels, the Elwah River and Coleville Bike Trails, Olympic National Park, and Port Angeles itself.

 

Spruce Railroad Trail, Lake Crescent, A Scenic “Must Do” By Foot or 2 Wheels, Near Port Angeles, WA

Distance: ~8-10 Miles Out & Back ~16-20 Total
Difficulty: Easy
Terrain: Flat, friendly(pine-needle cushy single-track)
Usage: Hikers, mountain bikers horses, leashed dogs
Caution: Cougar and bear country

If you’re in the Port Angeles area, a visit to lovely Lake Crescent is a must do. It just a scenic 20-mile drive out of town. There you’ll find a delightful trail that meanders along the shore and through the forest on a pine-needle path lined with ferns. This is the splendid Spruce Railroad Trail, great for hiking, running, or mountain biking.

The trail is part of the 134-mile-long Olympic Discovery Trail, a mountain bike-able route that crosses the northern part of the Olympic Peninsula. The trail follows the former Port Angeles Western Railroad route.

The trail begins with a short paved section. Scenic views of Barnes Point and Mount Storm King (post coming soon) loom above the lake.

short section of paved road

Views from the Spruce Railroad Trail, Lake CrescentRowing on lake crescent

Tunnel lake crescent

At ~ 2.5 miles in, you’ll traverse a short bridge and have a gander at the spectacular, “Punch bowl” of Lake Crescent—crystal clear as far 40 feet down.

bridge and mtns lake C

 

 

 

 

 

Lake Tahoe’s Flume Trail–Simply Epic

While there are plenty of more technical and longer rides around Lake Tahoe, the Flume Trail is world-renown for its scenic beauty and an absolute “must do” if you’re in the area. (I’m sure you’ll see why after you watch the videos.)

 

Lake Views: Spectacular, Stunning, Jaw Dropping

Distance: ~12-14 miles

Difficulty: Moderately difficult due to elevation of 7000′ to 8157 and a 1000 ft climb in the 1st 4 miles, technically simple

Description: Ride begins at the trailhead in the Spooner Lake Day Use Area in the Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park on the east side of Lake Tahoe. Follow the Flume Trail signs from the parking area via the North Canyon Road. In the first 4 miles, you’ll climb 1000 feet on fire road through aspen groves and meadows, followed by short descent to picturesque Marlette Lake.

Marlette Lake
Marlette Lake
Flume Trail Single Track
Lake Tahoe and Snow Capped Mountains Beyond
Fun Times on the Flume Trail

After ~1.5 miles of riding the dirt road along the lake, you’ll have ~4.5 miles of smooth, flat single track and breathtaking views 1600 feet above the east shore of Lake Tahoe. If you’re afraid of heights. some of the single-track sections might feel sketchy. Slow down and savor the beauty – the best section ends too quickly. You descend on a 3-mile fire road with lots of sand traps – beware.

Hourly shuttles summer and fall:  $18 The Flume Trail Bike Shop (mtb rentals too), 1115 Tunnel Creek Road, 775-298-2501

Notes: I’d say a shuttle is a must. In my opinion (and others’) it’s not safe to ride on the roads in Lake Tahoe.

I did this trail 4 years ago and didn’t stop once on the climb. This time the ride was more of a workout with stops for me—a humbling combination of altitude, lack of bike training, the fact that I was in the hospital 2 weeks prior, and perhaps being 4 years older (sigh). Would definitely do it again if I have the chance–those views (unlike me) never get old.