Lovely Lower Calf Falls, Grand Staircase Escalante, Bolder, UT

Lovely Lower Calf Falls, Grand Staircase Escalante, UT

Distance: 6 miles to the lower tier of the waterfall (~8+ to the upper tier)

Elevation: ~500 ft

Difficulty: Easy (with a fair amount of thick sand walking)

Highlight: 126-foot cascade into a pool, giant petroglyphs

Only had time for the lower tier of perennial Calf Falls – it did not disappoint, but the people did. Unfortunately, my itinerary landed me here midday on a Sunday. Not the time to visit–far too many humans for my liking…

As you can see, this amazing gem is definitely worth a visit. Lower Calf Falls cascades over a nearly vertical cliff face into a large pool several feet deep and is enclosed on three sides by sheer Navajo sandstone walls. Pick up an interpretive pamphlet at the trailhead to learn about the flora along the trail and giant petroglyphs in the distance (too far to get a good pic).

Without question, Grand Staircase Escalante is National Park caliber and deserves to be preserved and protected. Stay tuned for more posts on this area!

Soapbox: If you bring pets, please pick up after them! This trail and falls area is small and quickly becoming overrun and overused. One fellow watched me watching him get a bag out to pick up his big Labrador’s poop, and then when I turned away, he walked away from it. ARRRGH! No respect for fellow hikers or nature. They should permit this hike, at least on weekends, and fine those who litter/leave dog poop. Don’t get me started about the imbeciles who bag poop and then leave it. I can’t get my head around people who go somewhere to appreciate nature and then defile it.

Getting there: Take highway 12 to the BLM-managed Calf Creek Recreation Area. Parking lot has limited parking. Go early or you may have to park along the highway.

Exploring Enchanting Water Canyon—a Multifaceted Gem, Hildale, UT

Length: ~3 Miles roundtrip to the mini waterfall or as long as you’d like to take it, up and over and across the rim.

Difficulty: Moderate+ (To the waterfall is easy, after that, the hike becomes more difficult with elevation gain and a mix of route finding, scrambling, and bouldering. Route finding can be perplexing, if not impossible at the top where it becomes a choose your own adventure experience.)

Elevation gain: 2,208 ft (This only comes into play if you hike beyond the waterfall.)

In the spring, the reward of a short hike (~1.5 miles ea way) is a beguiling, mini waterfall tucked into a slot canyon grotto. Beyond the waterfall, you’ll encounter an interesting, often difficult-to-follow trail that involves some scrambling, bouldering, some exposure, and heights. Not surprisingly, this picturesque canyon is a popular spot for canyoneering. Supposedly you can get to “White Domes” from here, but it’s difficult to ascertain how. I’ll update this post if / when I find a good route to them in the future – cross-country, over the top, or traversing up the rocks from the bottom.

Notes: If you’re in it for the waterfall, early spring is your best bet. The waterfall disappears as the months get hotter and drier. Watch the weather for flash floods. Avoid weekend crowds by going early on a weekday. If you’re going to wander on the rim, I suggest you use GPS or Alltrails, as finding the route back down the canyon can be tricky (understatement). Parking is free.

Getting there: I-15 N to UT-9 E/W State St and UT-59 S to Utah Ave in Hildale. Take Utah Ave to Water Canyon Rd. Follow the dirt road to the parking lot.  

Happy trails!

Kanarra Falls, A Slippery Adventure in Kanarraville, UT

Distance:~4 Miles Roundtrip

Elevation gain: 587

Difficulty: Easy +, the first 0.8 miles is the only uphill portion. After that you’ll need to be mindful about your footing in the stream and on /off ladders and boulders if you attempt them. Know your limitations. It can take 7 hours for a rescue team to get here.

The first section of the trail follows an old access road (approximately 0.8 miles) up into Hurricane Cliffs before wandering into the lower, open sections of the canyon. This wonderful water hike takes you through and next to the stream bed all the way up the canyon. At the first falls you’ll encounter a 15-foot leaning ladder with metal rungs and no handrails. Proceed with caution. A little farther up the trail you will need to scramble over a large boulder (no ladder or hand holds there). Next you have the opportunity to submerge yourself in a natural pool. Finally, you will reach a narrowing slot canyon that will take you to the 2nd and final falls.  

WARNING: Flash floods can occur at any time of year but are most common from July through September in the late afternoons.

Notes: Requires a nonrefundable permit for $12 per person. (WORTH IT.) Happy they permit this hike to limit the number of people per day and keep it clean. Previously, I heard it was overrun and there was littering everywhere. (Red Reef should follow this example.)

Open from dawn to dusk.

Water shoes and hiking poles recommended.

No dogs. Please use bathrooms at the trailhead. This is a watershed for the town of Kanarraville—human and pet waste contaminate.

Getting there: From Cedar City, take 1-15 South and then exit at 51, Kanarraville (if you’re coming from the south, on I-15, take exit 42). Either way, go east on 100 North, drive to the end of the road and the trailhead parking lot.

Happy trails!

LEAVE NO TRACE.

Ashdown Gorgeous: Chasing Waterfalls

Distance: ~9+ miles RT

Elevation gain: ~700-1k FT 

Difficulty: Not technically difficult, but not for tenderfoots either. Teva or Keen style water shoes, or waterproof hikers are highly recommended as you are constantly in and out of the creek and the terrain is all rock, all the time. There is a wonderful payoff for those who persevere.

Ashdown Gorge Trail is an out and back, slot canyon trail that follows a rocky, turquoise creek as it flows under overhangs and between shear limestone cliffs. The views are spectacular and dizzying at times.

This is a refreshing hike with plenty of opportunities to cool off. If you’re hiking on a cool day, the water crossings can be chilly.I hiked it a couple weeks ago and jumped into a little pool. This time, Labor Day weekend, it was too chilly for me to dunk in under the falls. Low temps in the area are dropping into the 30s next week.

Notes: At mile 3.5, the creek/trail forks. (It’s easy to miss if you aren’t paying attention.)  Take the trail to the left to discover the 2 wonderful waterfalls of Lake Creek and Rattlesnake Creek (adds 2 miles roundtrip). Stay straight to experience the slot canyon cracking open to the big sky of the gorge. Be prepared for weather and don’t attempt this hike if there is rain in the forecast due to the danger of flash floods.

Tip: Post hike libations and sustenance at Don Miquel’s in Cedar City highly recommended.

Getting there: 15N to exit 57 to UT-130 to UT 14E UT (about 15 minutes form Cedar City) You can access the trail via the large pullout area along the 14 or via the Rattlesnake Trail, Crystal Springs / Potato Hollow Trail.

Chasing Waterfalls and Wildflowers: Three Sisters Falls Hike, SD County

San Diego County’s 3-tiered seasonal waterfall  in Cleveland National Forest is definitely worth a visit when the water is running.

3 sisters fall trailhead sign

 

 

 

 

 

At the beginning of the hike, these 3 lovely trees will greet you.

3 lovely trees 3 sisters hike

The falls are much more impressive than you might expect. As you hike down the trail, you can see the frothy, white veils in the distance.

 

For me, it was vaguely reminiscent of Yosemite. Of course, I was fortunate to experience the area after a rainy season, during the spring super bloom. The hillsides were green and sprinkled generously with wildflowers. If you’ve been following my superbloom posts (Walker Canyon, Diamond Valley Lake, Denk Mountain) this spring, you know I can’t get enough of these wildflowers. (I wasn’t expecting any on this hike and what a wonderful surprise to see the colorful abundance along the trail – perfect wildflower filters for my distant water shots.)

poppy filter 3 sistersbest wildflower filter 3 sistersCactus bloom 3 sisters

It’s a pleasant single-track, out & back trail that takes you down to the falls and then bring you back up to the parking area.

L with flowers on the trail 3 sisters

 

Lydia taking pics

 

 

 

 

rock falls 3 sistersfalls flower filter

The falls are a wonderful spot to have a picnic, cool off, and while away the afternoon – that is if you don’t mind being joined by too many humans who have the same idea. (Heavy sigh.) Be forewarned, this is one of San Diego’s most popular hikes so go early or be prepared for the crowds and a full parking lot.

If you want to add on another hike, the Cedar Creek Falls hike is in the vicinity too. Since I’ve done that one already, I decided to take the scenic drive out the other side on Descanso Road.

Descanso dirt road

The Scoop on 3 Sisters Waterfall Hike

Distance: 4 miles RT (out & back)

Elevation gain/loss :1000 ft (downhill on the way out, uphill on the way back)

Difficulty: Easy to moderate, depending on your fitness level. Trail run friendly on a non-crowded morning.

Getting there: From the town of Julian, turn left on Pine Hills Road, right on Eagle Creek, and left on Boulder Creek Road, which will become dirt road for the last 5 miles.

Note: Both Boulder Creek and Descanso are dirt roads with potholes, but no suv or 4-wheel drive needed. A regular passenger car with adequate ground clearance will do the trick as you have patience with potholes and bumps. However, it might not be prudent to attempt it without a SUV or 4-wheel drive after a heavy rain.

Fee: Display a National Forest Adventure Pass – $5 day pass [purchase info]  https://www.fs.fed.us/portaldata/r5/ap/r5-ap-vendors.php

On the way home, I added on short, vertical hike / scramble at Flinn Springs County Park on old highway 80 off highway 8. Post to come.