For views that rock you like a hurricane, visit Olympic National Park

Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park is so named because a prospector back in 1897 stood up there on a very windy day (100 mile an hour winds) and declared that it must be a hurricane. (It wasn’t, but the name stuck.) I lucked out with lovely weather the day I visited.

Hurricane Ridge is about 17 miles from Port Angeles and it’s a direct route to fun times. If you’re in the vicinity, it’s a must do.Whether you are just taking in the fantastic views, hiking, snowshoeing, skiing, snowboarding, or perhaps biking up. Yes, I said “biking up”. And yes, it’s a thing, if you’re into that kind of thing that is. With a challenging 5,242 ft ascent over 17 miles, the ride is known as one of Washington’s toughest and most scenic bike routes and what many say is one of the top cycling climbs in the U.S.. The climb averages a 5.3% grade with the steepest ½ mile at a 9.4% grade. Any takers?

It does sound intriguing though doesn’t it? I’d like to give it a go one day if my knees allow. It’s the downhill that really gives me the heebie-jeebies… I’d feel more secure on a mountain bile than road bike.  A car shuttle might be an option…

In any case, whatever your activity pleasure, you’ll find the Olympic National Park a perfect playground. Get more scoop at Visitor Center at mile one and pay to play when you reach the park’s toll booth at mile 6.

ONP fees

I pulled off at the first opportunity for a hike and did a pleasant out and back on the Switchback Trail. As the sign indicates, there are a few options available to string together longer hikes.

sign on hurricain ridgeswitchback trail scoop

switchback trailswitchback trail looking backL on the switchback trail

hurricaine road and beyond

I’m keeping my escapades short so I can cover more ground on my “PNW adventure sampler” tour. After driving up to the ridge to enjoy the panoramic views, I headed back down to plot my next excursion.

Evidence of “The Inconvenient Truth” – pictures are worth a thousand words…

L on Hurricaine ridge

 

Spokane Quickie

First impressions: Fantastic fall foliage, clean, bike-friendly city, easy to navigate, nice parks, incredible vistas, great centennial trail, rainy.

Arrived at the small airport at noon, rented a car, and headed directly to Spoke ‘N Sport. Pete set us up on a couple hybrids for our quick tour of Spokane. Just a half hour after landing, we’re pedaling through Riverfront Park, meandering by Gonzaga University where the fall’s display was in its full glory.

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Despite the brisk, wet weather, there were many runners (one stud without a shirt), bikers, and skateboarders about. In addition to nature’s displays, the city also features many outdoor art sculptures.

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Monroe Street Bridge, built in 1911

A little history:

Built in 1911, the 896 foot Monroe Street Bridge spans the Spokane River, which flows at 7,946 cubic feet per second here. The Spokane River is a tributary of the Columbia River, approximately 111 miles long, in northern Idaho and eastern Washington. At one time, Spokane was internationally known for its fishing, including Chinook, steelhead and coho salmon and, above the falls, a huge population of cutthroat trout. Sadly, those days are long gone.The Little Falls Dam, built in 1911 had only had a rudimentary fish ladder and the Long Lake Dam built in 1915 didn’t have one at all. In 1939, the Grand Coulee Dam blocked the Columbia, which sealed the salmon off from the entire Spokane River and thus destroyed a dietary staple and way of life of the Spokane Indians and many other tribe’s.

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Another lovely view of the Spokane River from the Riverfront Park bike trail

We managed to get in some great views of Spokane Falls, Riverfront Park and cruise an upscale neighborhood on Summit Road before the rain became more insistent.

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Moose sighting along Spokane’s Riverfront Park Bike Trail

Very enjoyable afternoon spent in Spokane. Would like to return and explore some more and do the Centennial bike trail to Coeur d’alene and back.

Coeur d’alene was next on the agenda, but the overly-manicured waterfront park, upscale shops and restaurants didn’t appeal in the pouring rain. We kept driving and happened upon the charming gem of Sandpoint, Idaho, where we spent the night.